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Can older workers stay productive? The role of ICT skills and training

Jong-Wha Lee, Do Won Kwak () and Eunbi Song

CAMA Working Papers from Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University

Abstract: This paper quantitatively examines the effects of aging on labor productivity using individual worker data in Korea. We find that attainment of information and communications technology (ICT) skills and participation in job-related training can help older workers stay productive. The estimation results present that ICT skills attainment has a positive effect on the wages of the older workers aged 50–64 with a high level of education or in a skill-intensive occupation. Job training also has a significant positive effect on the wages of older workers. Even compared to younger workers, older well-educated workers can be more productive through higher ICT skills attainment and job-training participation. The evidence suggests that a productivity decrease in line with the aging process can be mitigated by training aging workers to equip themselves with ICT skills.

Keywords: aging; education; information and communications technology; productivity; skill; training (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J14 J24 J31 O47 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 44 pages
Date: 2021-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-age, nep-edu, nep-eff, nep-hrm, nep-ict and nep-lma
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:een:camaaa:2021-04

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