EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Students' academic self-perception

Arnaud Chevalier, Stephen Gibbons (), Andy Thorpe, Martin Snell () and Sherria Hoskins

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: Participation rates in higher education differ persistently between some groups in society. Using two British datasets we investigate whether this gap is rooted in students’ mis-perception of their own and other’s ability, thereby increasing the expected costs to studying. Among high school pupils, we find that pupils with a more positive view of their academic abilities are more likely to expect to continue to higher education even after controlling for observable measures of ability and students’ characteristics. University students are also poor at estimating their own test-performance and over-estimate their predicted test score. However, females, white and working class students have less inflated view of themselves. Self-perception has limited impact on the expected probability of success and expected returns amongst these university students.

Keywords: Test performance; self-assessment; higher education participation; academic self-perception (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J16 I21 Y80 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2008-01
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/19377/ Open access version. (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Students' academic self-perception (2009) Downloads
Working Paper: Students academic self-perception (2008) Downloads
Working Paper: Students' Academic Self-Perception (2007) Downloads
Working Paper: Students' Academic Self Perception (2007) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ehl:lserod:19377

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library LSE Library Portugal Street London, WC2A 2HD, U.K.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by LSERO Manager ().

 
Page updated 2019-10-17
Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:19377