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Emerging economy MNEs: how does home country munificence matter?

Saul Estrin, Klaus Meyer and Adeline Pelletier

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) from emerging economies (EEs) are establishing operations in advanced economies (AEs), apparently departing from traditional models of internationalization. We explore an under-explored difference between EE MNE and their AE counterparts concerning their country of origin: EEs have less munificent business environments. This leads EE MNEs to make different location choices than AE MNEs when entering AEs, specifically because they are more deterred by barriers to entry. We therefore predict EE MNEs to be relatively more deterred by distance and weak intellectual property protection and relatively more attracted by diaspora of migrants and by markets. Our empirical results are consistent with these predictions

Keywords: Foreign direct investment; Location choice; Emerging economy multinationals; Home country munificence; Liability of foreignness (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: R14 J01 J50 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-06-30
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int
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Published in Journal of World Business, 30, June, 2018, 53(4), pp. 514-528. ISSN: 1090-9516

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