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Trade Liberalization and Mortality: Evidence from U.S. Counties

Justin Pierce () and Peter Schott ()

No 2016-094, Finance and Economics Discussion Series from Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.)

Abstract: We investigate the impact of a large economic shock on mortality. We find that counties more exposed to a plausibly exogenous trade liberalization exhibit higher rates of suicide and related causes of death, concentrated among whites, especially white males. These trends are consistent with our finding that more-exposed counties experience relative declines in manufacturing employment, a sector in which whites and males are over-represented. We also examine other causes of death that might be related to labor market disruption and find both positive and negative relationships. More-exposed counties, for example, exhibit lower rates of fatal heart attacks.

Keywords: International Trade; Mortality; Trade Policy; Unemployment (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 66 pages
Date: 2016-11
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-int
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http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/feds/2016/files/2016094pap.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Trade Liberalization and Mortality: Evidence from US Counties (2020) Downloads
Working Paper: Trade Liberalization and Mortality: Evidence from U.S. Counties (2016) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2016-94

DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2016.094

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