EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Agricultural mechanization in Ghana: Is specialization in agricultural mechanization a viable business model?

Nazaire Houssou, Xinshen Diao (), Frances Cossar, Shashi Kolavalli, Kipo Jimah and Patrick Aboagye

No 1255, IFPRI discussion papers from International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Abstract: Even though the intention of the government is to promote private sector-led mechanization, findings suggest that the AMSEC model is unlikely to be a profitable business model attractive to private investors even with the current level of subsidy. The low tractor utilization rate as a result of low operational scale is the most important constraint to the intertemporal profitability of tractor-hire services. The government can play an important role in facilitating the development of a tractor service market; however, the successful development of such a market depends on the incentive and innovation of the private sector, including farmers who want to own tractors as part of their business portfolio, traders who know how to bring in affordable tractors and expand the market, and manufacturers in exporting countries who want to seek a long-term potential market opportunity in Ghana and in other west African countries.

Keywords: agricultural transformation; mechanization; agricultural mechanization; tractor hire; Investment; Government policy; subsidies; Private ownership; Market development; Private sector; , (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr and nep-agr
References: View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (13) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01255.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Agricultural mechanization in Ghana: Is specialization in agricultural mechanization a viable business model? (2013) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1255

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in IFPRI discussion papers from International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2021-10-18
Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1255