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Land constraints and agricultural intensification in Ethiopia: A village-level analysis of high-potential areas

Derek Headey (), Mekdim Dereje, Jacob Ricker-Gilbert (), Anna Josephson () and Alemayehu Taffesse
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Mekdim Dereje Regassa

No 1290, IFPRI discussion papers from International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Abstract: Highland Ethiopia is one of the most densely populated regions of Africa and has long been associated with both Malthusian disasters and Boserupian agricultural intensification. This paper explores the race between these two countervailing forces, with the goal of informing two important policy questions. First, how do rural Ethiopians adapt to land constraints? And second, do land constraints significantly influence welfare outcomes in rural Ethiopia?

Keywords: Smallholders; Population density; Farm size; Intensification; Agricultural productivity; Land use; Land allocation; Land management (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-agr, nep-dev and nep-eff
Date: 2013
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (6) Track citations by RSS feed

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Related works:
Journal Article: Land constraints and agricultural intensification in Ethiopia: A village-level analysis of high-potential areas (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Land constraints and agricultural intensification in Ethiopia: A village-level analysis of high-potential areas (2013) Downloads
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