EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

What Persuades Voters? A Field Experiment on Political Campaigning

Jared Barton (), Marco Castillo () and Ragan Petrie ()
Additional contact information
Jared Barton: Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science and Department of Economics, George Mason University

No 1031, Working Papers from George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science

Abstract: Political campaigns spend millions of dollars each voting cycle on persuading voters, and it is well established that these campaigns do affect voting decisions. What is less understood is what element of campaigningÑthe content of the message or the delivery method itselfÑ sways voters, a question that relates back to how advertising works generally. We use a field experiment in a 2010 general election for local office to identify the persuasive mechanism behind a particular form of campaigning: candidate door-to-door canvassing. In the experiment, the candidate either canvassed a household or left literature without meeting the voters. In addition, the literature either contained information on the candidate or on how to vote. Our main result is that voters are most persuaded by personal contact (the delivery method), rather than the content of the message. Given our setting, we conclude that personal contact seems to work, not through social pressure, but by providing a costly or verifiable signal of quality. Length: 49

JEL-codes: D72 C93 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012-01
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.gmu.edu/schools/chss/economics/icesworkingpapers.gmu.edu/pdf/1031.pdf (application/pdf)
Our link check indicates that this URL is bad, the error code is: 404 Not Found

Related works:
Journal Article: What Persuades Voters? A Field Experiment on Political Campaigning (2014) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:gms:wpaper:1031

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Stan Tsirulnikov ().

 
Page updated 2018-09-22
Handle: RePEc:gms:wpaper:1031