EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Forecasts of Individual FOMC Members: New Evidence after Ten Years

Jaime Marquez () and Sarp Kalfa ()
Additional contact information
Jaime Marquez: Johns Hopkins SAIS

No 2021-003, Working Papers from The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting

Abstract: A central tenet of Macroeconomics is that monetary policy is forward looking. But Romer (2010) uses the forecasts of the participants of the U.S. Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) and shows a remarkable heterogeneity in these participants’ outlooks. What accounts for this forecast heterogeneity? And how can one reconcile the tension between the need for a single monetary and the heterogeneity of forecasts that are steering it? To study these two questions, we continue the line of work initiated by Romer (2010). We study two sources of heterogeneity: Institutional and Dynamic. Institutional Heterogeneity is about differences in participants’ education, voting status, and regional affiliation — and the associated implications for forecast rationality. Dynamic Heterogeneity is about herd behavior, extreme forecasts, temporal aggregation, and macroeconomic shocks. These factors emphasize that forecast heterogeneity is not a given constant but rather, that it changes in response to the alignment between private and social interests of the FOMC. We find that forecast revisions are large and remarkably heterogenous across participants. Specifically, the FOMC’s forecast heterogeneity is systematically related to differences in participants’ education, voting status, and regional affiliation, as Romer anticipated. These results should not be surprising: heterogeneity is a built-in feature of the functioning of the Federal Reserve System and the role of the FOMC is to reconcile the differences. The reconciliation of private and public interests, and the implied heterogeneity of courses of action, involves a conversation in which the Chair gets the benefit of the doubt.

JEL-codes: C3 E5 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 38 pages
Date: 2021-04
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cba, nep-mac and nep-mon
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www2.gwu.edu/~forcpgm/2021-003.pdf First version, 2021 (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:gwc:wpaper:2021-003

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by GW Economics Department ().

 
Page updated 2022-10-02
Handle: RePEc:gwc:wpaper:2021-003