EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does the Gap in Family-friendly Policies Drive the Family Gap?

Helena Nielsen (), Marianne Simonsen () and Mette Verner ()

No 02-19, Working Papers from University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics

Abstract: A segregation of the labour market into a family-friendly and a non-family friendly sector has the effect that women self-select into the sectors depending on institutional constraints, preferences for family-friendly working conditions and expected wage differences. We find that neglecting the sector dimension tends to understate the effect of birth-related interruptions in both sectors. The combined effect of a large depreciation effect and no recovery means that females in the non-family friendly sector (e.g. private sector) are punished severely after childbirth. In the family friendly sector (e.g. public sector), we find complete catch up.

Keywords: Fertility; family gap; career interruptions; wages; public vs. private sector (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J13 J22 J33 J45 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 38 pages
Date: 2002-05-07
Note: Published in Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 106(4), pp721-744, 2004
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (13) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.hha.dk/nat/WPER/02-19_mv.pdf (application/pdf)
Our link check indicates that this URL is bad, the error code is: 500 Can't connect to www.hha.dk:80 (No such host is known. )

Related works:
Journal Article: Does the Gap in Family‐friendly Policies Drive the Family Gap?* (2004) Downloads
Working Paper: Does the Gap in Family-Friendly Policies Drive the Family Gap? Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hhs:aareco:2002_019

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Helle Vinbaek Stenholt (). This e-mail address is bad, please contact .

 
Page updated 2020-05-24
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2002_019