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Firms' knowledge acquisition during dual-track VET: Which sources are important for innovativeness?

Christian Rupietta, Harald Pfeifer () and Uschi Backes-Gellner

No 131, Economics of Education Working Paper Series from University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW)

Abstract: Researchers debate for more than 3 decades on the effect of vocational training on innovations. While some studies show a negative effect of vocational education that firms organize on its own, other studies show a positive effect for vocational education that is organized on a sectoral or national level such as in Germany or Switzerland. A characteristic of these vocational education and training (VET) systems is a high level of standardization and regulation. In fact many elements of VET are regulated in national law, training ordinances and curricula, but firms nevertheless less still have a high flexibility when it comes to the organization of workplace training. In this paper we analyze how firms organize their workplace training, which training methods they use and which training methods they apply jointly. As each training method e.g. training during work or external courses, transfers a specific set of skills and knowledge to apprentices, we analyze how firms use training methods to promote their innovation activity. Our results show that there is a large variety in the organization of workplace training. In sum firms make use of the flexibility to design workplace training that fits their needs best. We conclude with implications for the design of VET systems and firms.

Keywords: Learning Modes; Innovation; Vocational Education; fsQCA; negative binomial regression (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 35 pages
Date: 2017-07
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eur, nep-ino, nep-knm and nep-sbm
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