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OCCUPATIONAL STEREOTYPES AND GENDER-SPECIFIC JOB SATISFACTION

Simon Janssen () and Uschi Backes-Gellner

No 107, Working Papers from University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU)

Abstract: Using representative data containing information on job satisfaction and worker’s gender-specific prejudices, we investigate the relationship between stereotyping and job satisfaction. We show that women in stereotypically male jobs are significantly less satisfied with their work climate and job contents than in stereotypically female jobs but more satisfied with their income in those same jobs. Our findings indicate that women trade-off their higher income satisfaction against the negative consequences of stereotyping. As long as we take into account that stereotypically male jobs are physically more demanding than stereotypically female jobs, men are generally more satisfied with stereotypically male jobs.

Keywords: Identity; Job satisfaction; social norms; labor market discrimination (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J24 J28 J71 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 34 pages
Date: 2009-09, Revised 2014-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe and nep-lab
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http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/ISU_WPS/107_ISU_full.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Occupational Stereotypes and Gender-Specific Job Satisfaction (2016) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iso:wpaper:0107

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