EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

First- and Second-Generation Migrants in Germany - What Do We Know and What Do People Think

Michael Fertig and Christoph Schmidt

No 286, IZA Discussion Papers from Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Abstract: This paper provides a snapshot of the stock of immigrants in Germany using the 1995 wave of the Mikrozensus with a particular emphasis on distinguishing first- and second-generation migrants. On the basis of this portrait, we draw attention to the empirically most relevant groups of immigrants and review the received literature on economic migration research in the three principal avenues of migration research. The aspect which we concentrate on in our empirical application, the welfare dependence of immigrants, is a matter of intense debate among economists and policy makers. We contrast the very moderate actual public transfer payment dependence of migrants to Germany with the perception of migrants dependence on public assistance by Germans from various population strata.

Keywords: public transfers; Immigration; attitudes (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J61 J15 I30 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2001-04
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (51) Track citations by RSS feed

Published in: Ralph Rotte / Peter Stein (eds.), Migration Policy and the Economy: International Perspectives, Munich 2001

Downloads: (external link)
http://ftp.iza.org/dp286.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: First- and Second-Generation Migrants in Germany - What Do We Know and What Do People Think (2001) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iza:izadps:dp286

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
IZA, Margard Ody, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in IZA Discussion Papers from Institute of Labor Economics (IZA) IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Holger Hinte ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-16
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp286