EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Role of Social Networks in Cultural Assimilation

Thierry Verdier () and Yves Zenou ()

No 9341, IZA Discussion Papers from Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Abstract: We develop a model where, in the first stage, minority individuals have to decide whether or not they want to assimilate to the majority culture while, in the second stage, all individuals (both from the majority and the minority group) embedded in a network have to decide how much effort they exert in some activity (say education). We show that the more central minority agents are in the social network, the more they assimilate to the majority culture. We also show that denser networks tend to favor assimilation so that, for example, it is easier to assimilate in a complete network than in a star-shaped network. We show that the subgame-perfect equilibrium is not optimal because there is not enough activity and assimilation. We then endogeneize the network and show under which condition the ethnic minorities either assimilate to or separated themselves from the majority group.

Keywords: network centrality; ethnic minorities; majority individuals; assimilation; network formation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D85 J15 Z13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-mic, nep-net, nep-soc and nep-ure
Date: 2015-09
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (3) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ftp.iza.org/dp9341.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: The role of social networks in cultural assimilation (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: The role of social networks in cultural assimilation (2017)
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9341

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
IZA, Margard Ody, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in IZA Discussion Papers from Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Mark Fallak ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-24
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9341