EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter?

Jing You (), Katsushi Imai () and Raghav Gaiha
Additional contact information
Raghav Gaiha: Faculty of Management Studies, University of Delhi, India and Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, USA

No DP2015-20, Discussion Paper Series from Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University

Abstract: This paper uses Chinese household data for 1989-2009 to explain why mean nutrient intake has declined despite economic growth. We focus on household heterogeneity in nutrient intake response to increases in household income allowing for its endogeneity. A quantile instrumental-variable fixed-effects panel estimation shows that rising income tends to reduce inequality in macronutrient intake in both urban and rural areas in 2004-2009. This is driven by increases in nutrient intake for the urban nutrient poor and falls in nutrient intake for the rural nutrient non-poor. On the other hand, fluctuations in prices of meat, eggs and oil increase nutrition poverty.

Keywords: Dual sourcing; Outside option; Spillover; Vertical relations (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C23 I10 I31 O53 Q18 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 44 pages
Date: 2015-04
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2015-20.pdf First version, 2015 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter? (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter? (2015) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-20

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Paper Series from Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University 2-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 JAPAN. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Office of Promoting Research Collaboration, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University ().

 
Page updated 2023-01-21
Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-20