EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Time-Series Evidence of the Effect of the Minimum Wage on Youth Employment and Unemployment

Charles Brown, Curtis Gilroy and Andrew Kohen ()

No 790, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: While previous time series studies have quite consistently found that the minimum wage reduces teenage employment, the extent of this reduction is much less certain. Moreover, because few previous studies report results of more than one specification, the causes of differences in estimated impacts are not well understood. Less consensus is evident on the effect of the minimum wage on teenage unemployment, or its relative impact on black and white teenagers. The purpose of this paper is both to update earlier work and to analyze the sensitivity of estimated minimum wage effects to alternative specification choices. In addition to providing estimates of the effect of minimum wage increases on aggregate employment and unemployment rates of teenagers, we explore several related issues: the relative importance of changing the level and coverage of the minimum wage; the timing of responses to a change in the minimum; effects on part-time and full-time work; effects on young adults (age 20-24).

Date: 1981-10
Note: LS
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (12) Track citations by RSS feed

Published as Brown, Charles, Curtis Gilroy, and Andrew Kohen. "Time Series Evidence of the Effect of the Minimum Wage on Youth Employment and Unemployment." Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 18, No. 1 (Winter 1983), pp. 3-31.

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w0790.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Time-Series Evidence of the Effect of the Minimum Wage on Youth Employment and Unemployment (1983) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:0790

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w0790

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2022-06-08
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:0790