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The Depressing Effect of Agricultural Institutions on the Prewar Japanese Economy

Fumio Hayashi and Edward Prescott

No 12081, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: The question we address in this paper is why the Japanese miracle didn't take place until after World War II. For much of the pre-WWII period, Japan's real GNP per worker was not much more than a third of that of the U.S., with falling capital intensity. We argue that its major cause is a barrier that kept agricultural employment constant at about 14 million throughout the prewar period. In our two-sector neoclassical growth model, the barrier-induced sectoral mis-allocation of labor and a resulting disincentive for capital accumulation account well for the depressed output level. Were it not for the barrier, Japan's prewar GNP per worker would have been close to a half of the U.S. The labor barrier existed because, we argue, the prewar patriarchy, armed with paternalistic clauses in the prewar Civil Code, forced the son designated as heir to stay in agriculture.

JEL-codes: E1 O1 O4 N3 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr, nep-dev, nep-dge, nep-his, nep-mac and nep-sea
Date: 2006-03
Note: EFG PR
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Published as Hayashi, Fumio and Edward C. Prescott. “The Depressing Effect of Agricultural Institutions on the Prewar Japanese Economy.” Journal of Political Economy 116, 4 (August 2008): 573-632.

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