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The Effectiveness of Cigarette Regulations in Reducing Cases of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Sara Markowitz ()

No 12527, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is a leading cause of mortality among infants and is responsible for thousands of infant deaths every year. Prenatal smoking and postnatal environmental smoke have been identified as strong risk factors for SIDS. Given the link between smoking and SIDS, this paper examines the direct effects of cigarette prices, taxes and clean indoor air laws in explaining changes in the incidence of SIDS over time in the United States. State-level counts of SIDS cases are generated from death certificates for 1973 to 2003. After controlling for some observed and unobserved confounding factors, the results show that higher cigarette prices and taxes are associated with reductions in SIDS cases. Stronger restrictions on smoking in restaurants and child care centers are also effective in reducing SIDS deaths.

JEL-codes: I0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea, nep-pbe and nep-reg
Date: 2006-09
Note: CH HE
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Published as Markowitz, Sara, 2008. "The effectiveness of cigarette regulations in reducing cases of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 106-133, January.

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