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Do Food Stamps Cause Obesity? Evidence from Immigrant Experience

Neeraj Kaushal

No 12849, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: I use changes in immigrant eligibility for food stamps under the 1996 federal law and heterogeneous state responses to set up a natural experiment research design to study the effect of food stamps on Body Mass Index (BMI) of adults in immigrant families. I find that in the post-1996 period food stamps use by foreign-born unmarried mothers with a high school or lower education was 10 percentage points higher in states with substitute programs than in states that implemented the federal ban. However, this increase in FSP participation was not associated with any statistically significant difference in BMI. I find that FSP participation was associated a statistically insignificant 0.3 percent increase in BMI among low-educated unmarried mothers.

JEL-codes: H0 I0 I3 I31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2007-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr, nep-hea and nep-pbe
Note: EH PE
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (40)

Published as Kaushal, N., 2007. "Do food stamps cause obesity?: Evidence from immigrant experience," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 968-991, September.

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