EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Firm Level Heterogeneous Productivity and Demand Shocks: Evidence from Bangladesh

Hiau Looi Kee () and Kala Krishna ()

No 13698, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper looks at the predictions of a standard heterogeneous firm model regarding the exports of firms across markets in response to a particular trade policy "experiment" and compares these predictions to the data. A unique feature of our data is that it has information on the exports of the same firm to different markets which allows us to look for a new set of predictions of such models. We argue that while certain predictions seem consistent with the data, others are not. We then describe the patterns found in the data and argue that firm and market specific demand shocks help explain a number of these anomalies. These parsimoniously capture factors, like business contacts or networks, or even fashion shocks, that make buyers more attracted to one firm rather than another in a particular market.

JEL-codes: F12 F13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2007-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int
Note: ITI PR
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Published as Hiau Looi Kee & Kala Krishna, 2008. "Firm-Level Heterogeneous Productivity and Demand Shocks: Evidence from Bangladesh," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 457-62, May.

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w13698.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Firm-Level Heterogeneous Productivity and Demand Shocks: Evidence from Bangladesh (2008) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13698

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w13698

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2021-10-07
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13698