EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Returns to the Brain Drain and Brain Circulation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Some Computations Using Data from Ghana

Yaw Nyarko

No 16813, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: We look at the decision of the government or "central planner" in the allocation of scarce governmental resources for tertiary education, as well as that for the individual. We provide estimates of the net present values, or cost and benefits. These include costs of tertiary education; the benefits of improved skills of those who remain in the country; and also takes into account the flows of the skilled out of the country (the brain drain) as well as the remittances they bring into the country. Our results are positive for the net benefits relative to costs. Our results suggest that (i) there may be room for creative thinking about the possibility that the brain drain could provide mechanisms for dramatic increases in education levels within African nations; and (ii) by at least one metric, spending by African nations on higher education in this period yielded positive returns on the investment. Our results on the individual decision problem resolve a paradox in the returns to education literature which finds low returns to tertiary education.

JEL-codes: F35 F43 O1 O55 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2011-02
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-dev, nep-lab and nep-mig
Note: LS
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Published as The Returns to the Brain Drain and Brain Circulation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Some Computations Using Data from Ghana , Yaw Nyarko. in African Successes, Volume II: Human Capital , Edwards, Johnson, and Weil. 2016

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w16813.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Chapter: The Returns to the Brain Drain and Brain Circulation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Some Computations Using Data from Ghana (2014) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16813

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w16813

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2022-01-09
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16813