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The Effects of Housing and Neighborhood Conditions on Child Mortality

Brian A. Jacob, Jens Ludwig and Douglas Miller ()

No 17369, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: In this paper we estimate the causal effects on child mortality from moving into less distressed neighborhood environments. We match mortality data to information on every child in public housing that applied for a housing voucher in Chicago in 1997 (N=11,848). Families were randomly assigned to the voucher wait list, and only some families were offered vouchers. The odds ratio for the effects of being offered a housing voucher on overall mortality rates is equal to 1.11 for all children (95% CI 0.54 to 2.10), 1.50 for boys (95% CI 0.72 to 2.89) and 0.00 for girls - that is, the voucher offer is perfectly protective for mortality for girls (95% CI 0 to 0.79). Our paper also addresses a methodological issue that may arise in studies of low-probability outcomes - perfect prediction by key explanatory variables.

JEL-codes: H75 I12 R38 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-hea and nep-ure
Date: 2011-08
Note: CH HE PE
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Published as Jacob, Brian A. & Ludwig, Jens & Miller, Douglas L., 2013. "The effects of housing and neighborhood conditions on child mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 195-206.

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