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Agricultural Policy, Migration, and Malaria in the 1930s United States

Alan Barreca (), Price Fishback () and Shawn Kantor

No 17526, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) caused a population shift in the United States in the 1930s. Evaluating the effects of the AAA on the incidence of malaria can therefore offer important lessons regarding the broader consequences of demographic changes. Using a quasi-first difference model and a robust set of controls, we find a negative association between AAA expenditures and malaria death rates at the county level. Further, we find the AAA caused relatively low-income groups to migrate from counties with high-risk malaria ecologies. These results suggest that the AAA-induced migration played an important role in the reduction of malaria.

JEL-codes: H3 H51 I15 N32 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2011-10
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr, nep-cis and nep-mig
Note: DAE HE
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Published as “Agricultural Policy, Migration, and Malaria in the 1930s United States.” With Alan Barreca and Shawn Kantor. Explorations in Economic History 49 (2012): 381-398.

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