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Child Gender And Parental Investments In India: Are Boys And Girls Treated Differently?

Silvia Barcellos, Leandro Carvalho and Adriana Lleras-Muney

No 17781, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Although previous research has not always found that boys and girls are treated differently in rural India, son-biased stopping rules imply that estimates of the effect of gender on parental investments are likely to be biased because girls systematically end up in larger families. We propose a novel identification strategy for overcoming this bias. We document that boys receive significantly more childcare time than girls. In addition boys are more likely to be breastfed longer, and to be given vaccinations and vitamin supplementation. We then present suggestive evidence that the differential treatment of boys is neither due to their greater needs nor to the effect of anticipated family size.

JEL-codes: I15 J16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem and nep-ltv
Date: 2012-01
Note: CH HE LS
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Published as “Child gender and Parental Investments in India: Are boys and Girls Treated Differently?” forthcoming, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. (joint with Silvia H. Barcellos and Leandro Carvalho)

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Related works:
Journal Article: Child Gender and Parental Investments in India: Are Boys and Girls Treated Differently? (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Child Gender and Parental Investments in India Are Boys and Girls Treated Differently? (2010) Downloads
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