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The Effect of Education Policy on Crime: An Intergenerational Perspective

Costas Meghir (), Mårten Palme () and Marieke Schnabel

No 18145, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: The intergenerational transmission of human capital and the extent to which policy interventions can affect it is an issue of importance. Policies are often evaluated on either short term outcomes or just in terms of their effect on individuals directly targeted. If such policies shift outcomes across generations their benefits may be much larger than originally thought. We provide evidence on the intergenerational impact of policy by showing that educational reform in Sweden reduced crime rates of the targeted generation and their children by comparable amounts. We attribute these outcomes to improved family resources and to better parenting.

JEL-codes: I24 J1 J18 J24 J62 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-edu, nep-lab and nep-ltv
Date: 2012-06
Note: CH ED LS
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Related works:
Working Paper: The effect of education policy on crime: an intergenerational perspective (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: The Effect of Education Policy on Crime: An Intergenerational Perspective (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: The effect of education policy on crime: an intergenerational perspective (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: The Effect of Education Policy on Crime: An Intergenerational Perspective (2011) Downloads
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