EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

How Do Regulators Influence Mortgage Risk: Evidence from an Emerging Market

John Campbell (), Tarun Ramadorai () and Benjamin Ranish

No 18394, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: To understand the effects of regulation on mortgage risk, it is instructive to track the history of regulatory changes in a country rather than to rely entirely on cross- country evidence that can be contaminated by unobserved heterogeneity. However, in developed countries with fairly stable systems of financial regulation, it is difficult to track these effects. We employ loan-level data on over a million loans disbursed in India over the 1995 to 2010 period to understand how fast-changing regulation impacted mortgage lending and risk. We use cross-sectional differences in the time- series variation of delinquency rates, conditional on initial interest rates, to detect the effects of regulation on mortgage delinquencies.

JEL-codes: G21 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ban, nep-cba, nep-rmg and nep-ure
Date: 2012-09
Note: AP CF
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w18394.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: How Do Regulators Influence Mortgage Risk? Evidence from an Emerging Market (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: How Do Regulators Influence Mortgage Risk: Evidence from an Emerging Market (2012) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18394

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w18394

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-10-11
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18394