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Family Disadvantage and the Gender Gap in Behavioral and Educational Outcomes

David Autor, David Figlio, Krzysztof Karbownik (), Jeffrey Roth and Melanie Wasserman

No 22267, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Using birth certificates matched to schooling records for Florida children born 1992–2002, we assess whether family disadvantage disproportionately impedes the pre-market development of boys. We find that, relative to their sisters, boys born to disadvantaged families have higher rates of disciplinary problems, lower achievement scores, and fewer high-school completions. Evidence supports that this is a causal effect of the post-natal environment; family disadvantage is unrelated to the gender gap in neonatal health. We conclude that the gender gap among black children is larger than among white children in substantial part because black children are raised in more disadvantaged families.

JEL-codes: I24 J12 J13 J16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016-05
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-edu, nep-lab, nep-ltv and nep-ure
Note: CH LS
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Published as David Autor & David Figlio & Krzysztof Karbownik & Jeffrey Roth & Melanie Wasserman, 2019. "Family Disadvantage and the Gender Gap in Behavioral and Educational Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, vol 11(3), pages 338-381.

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Journal Article: Family Disadvantage and the Gender Gap in Behavioral and Educational Outcomes (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Family Disadvantage and the Gender Gap in Behavioral and Educational Outcomes (2016) Downloads
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