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Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program

Jorge Luis Garcia (), James Heckman and Anna L. Ziff

No 23412, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper studies the life-cycle impacts of a widely-emulated high-quality, intensive early childhood program with long-term follow up. The program starts early in life (at 8 weeks of age) and is evaluated by an RCT. There are multiple treatment effects which we summarize through interpretable aggregates. Girls have a greater number of statistically significant treatment effects than boys and effect sizes for them are generally bigger. The source of this difference is worse home environments for girls with greater scope for improvement by the program. Fathers of sons support their families more than fathers of daughters.

JEL-codes: C93 I28 J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dcm, nep-dem and nep-ure
Date: 2017-05
Note: CH ED
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (6) Track citations by RSS feed

Published as Jorge Luis García & James J. Heckman & Anna L. Ziff, 2018. "Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program," European Economic Review, .

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Journal Article: Gender differences in the benefits of an influential early childhood program (2018) Downloads
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