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Socioeconomic Status and Macroeconomic Expectations

Sreyoshi Das, Camelia Kuhnen () and Stefan Nagel ()

No 24045, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: We show that individuals' macroeconomic expectations are influenced by their socioeconomic status (SES). People with higher income or higher education are more optimistic about future macroeconomic developments, including business conditions, the national unemployment rate, and stock market returns. The spread in beliefs between high- and low-SES individuals diminishes significantly during recessions. A comparison with professional forecasters and historical data reveals that the beliefs wedge reflects excessive pessimism on the part of low-SES individuals. SES-driven expectations help explain why higher-SES individuals are more inclined to invest in the stock market and more likely to consider purchasing homes, durable goods, or cars.

JEL-codes: E03 E71 G02 G4 G41 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-11
Note: AP
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Published as Sreyoshi Das & Camelia M Kuhnen & Stefan Nagel, 2020. "Socioeconomic Status and Macroeconomic Expectations," The Review of Financial Studies, vol 33(1), pages 395-432.

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