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The Effect of Education on Health and Mortality: A Review of Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence

Titus Galama (), Adriana Lleras-Muney and Hans van Kippersluis

No 24225, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Education is strongly associated with better health and longer lives. However, the extent to which education causes health and longevity is widely debated. We develop a human capital framework to structure the interpretation of the empirical evidence. We then review evidence on the causal effects of education on mortality and its two most common preventable causes: smoking and obesity. We focus attention on evidence from Randomized Controlled Trials, twin studies, and quasi-experiments. There is no convincing evidence of an effect of education on obesity, and the effects on smoking are only apparent when schooling reforms affect individuals’ track or their peer group, but not when they simply increase the duration of schooling. An effect of education on mortality exists in some contexts but not in others, and seems to depend on (i) gender; (ii) the labor market returns to education; (iii) the quality of education; and (iv) whether education affects the quality of individuals’ peers.

JEL-codes: I26 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-edu, nep-exp and nep-hea
Date: 2018-01
Note: CH DEV HE LS
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