EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Supplemental Security Income and Child Outcomes: Evidence from Birth Weight Eligibility Cutoffs

Melanie Guldi, Amelia Hawkins, Jeffrey Hemmeter and Lucie Schmidt ()

No 24913, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Low birth weight infants born to mothers with low educational attainment have a double hurdle to overcome in the production of human capital. We examine whether income transfers in the form of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments for children with disabilities can help close the gap in outcomes due to this initial health and environmental disadvantage. We exploit a discontinuity in SSI eligibility at 1200 grams and use a regression discontinuity approach to produce causal estimates of the effects of SSI eligibility. We find that eligibility increases disability benefit participation, improves child outcomes and parenting behaviors, and shifts maternal labor supply from full to part time.

JEL-codes: H51 H53 I38 J21 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-lma
Date: 2018-08
Note: CH HE LS PE
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w24913.pdf (application/pdf)
Access to the full text is generally limited to series subscribers, however if the top level domain of the client browser is in a developing country or transition economy free access is provided. More information about subscriptions and free access is available at http://www.nber.org/wwphelp.html. Free access is also available to older working papers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24913

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w24913
The price is Paper copy available by mail.

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-05
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24913