EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Inexpensive Heating Reduces Winter Mortality

Janjala Chirakijja, Seema Jayachandran and Pinchuan Ong

No 25681, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper examines how the price of home heating affects mortality in the US. Exposure to cold is one reason that mortality peaks in winter, and a higher heating price increases exposure to cold by reducing heating use. It also raises energy bills, which could affect health by decreasing other health-promoting spending. Our empirical approach combines spatial variation in the energy source used for home heating and temporal variation in the national prices of natural gas versus electricity. We find that a lower heating price reduces winter mortality, driven mostly by cardiovascular and respiratory causes.

JEL-codes: I1 J14 Q41 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019-03
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ene and nep-hea
Note: AG EEE HC HE
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w25681.pdf (application/pdf)
Access to the full text is generally limited to series subscribers, however if the top level domain of the client browser is in a developing country or transition economy free access is provided. More information about subscriptions and free access is available at http://www.nber.org/wwphelp.html. Free access is also available to older working papers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Inexpensive Heating Reduces Winter Mortality (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Inexpensive Heating Reduces Winter Mortality (2019) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25681

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w25681
The price is Paper copy available by mail.

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2020-07-07
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25681