EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Federalizing Benefits: The Introduction of Supplemental Security Income and the Size of the Safety Net

Andrew Goodman-Bacon and Lucie Schmidt ()

No 25962, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: In 1974, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) federalized cash welfare programs for the aged, blind, and disabled, imposing a national minimum benefit. Because of pre-existing variation in generosity, SSI differentially raised payment levels in states below its benefit floor, but had no effect in states that paid above it. We show that SSI increased disability participation in states with the lowest pre-SSI benefits, but shrank non-disability cash transfer programs. For every four new SSI recipients, three came from other welfare programs. Each dollar of per capita SSI income increased total per capita transfer income by just over 50 cents.

JEL-codes: H53 H75 H77 I38 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019-06
Note: DAE LS PE
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w25962.pdf (application/pdf)
Access to the full text is generally limited to series subscribers, however if the top level domain of the client browser is in a developing country or transition economy free access is provided. More information about subscriptions and free access is available at http://www.nber.org/wwphelp.html. Free access is also available to older working papers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25962

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w25962
The price is Paper copy available by mail.

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-05
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25962