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Leaving the Enclave: Historical Evidence on Immigrant Mobility from the Industrial Removal Office

Ran Abramitzky, Leah Boustan () and Dylan Connor

No 27372, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: We study a program that funded 39,000 Jewish households in New York City to leave enclave neighborhoods circa 1910. Compared to their neighbors with the same occupation and income score at baseline, program participants earned 4 percent more ten years after removal, and these gains persisted to the next generation. Men who left enclaves also married spouses with less Jewish names, but they did not choose less Jewish names for their children. Gains were largest for men who spent more years outside of an enclave. Our results suggest that leaving ethnic neighborhoods could facilitate economic advancement and assimilation into the broader society, but might make it more difficult to retain cultural identity.

JEL-codes: J15 N12 R23 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his, nep-lab, nep-mig and nep-ure
Note: DAE LS
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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