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Protests

Davide Cantoni, Andrew Kao, David Yang and Noam Yuchtman

No 31617, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Citizens have long taken to the streets to demand change, expressing political views that may otherwise be suppressed. Protests have produced change at local, national, and international scales, including spectacular moments of political and social transformation. We document five new empirical patterns describing 1.2 million protest events across 218 countries between 1980 and 2020. First, autocracies and weak democracies experienced a trend break in protests during the Arab Spring. Second, protest movements also rose in importance following the Arab Spring. Third, protest movements geographically diffuse over time, spiking to their peak, before falling off. Fourth, a country’s year-to-year economic performance is not strongly correlated with protests; individual values are predictive of protest participation. Fifth, the US, China, and Russia are the most over-represented countries by their share of academic studies. We discuss each pattern’s connections to the existing literature and anticipate paths for future work.

JEL-codes: P0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2023-08
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cis, nep-cna, nep-pol and nep-soc
Note: POL
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