EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing Industries: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufacturing

Eli Berman (), John Bound and Zvi Griliches

No 4255, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper investigates the shift in demand towards skilled labor in U.S. manufacturing. Between 1979 and 1989. employment of production workers in manufacturing dropped by 2.2 mil1ion or 15 percent while employment of non-production workers rose by 3 percent. A decomposition of changing employment patterns in each of 450 industries reveals that the defense buildup and trade deficits can account for only a small part of the shift in demand towards non-production workers. We conclude that production labor-saving technological change is the most likely explanation for the shift in demand towards non-production workers since the shift is mostly due to changes in labor demand within industries rather than reallocation of employment towards industries with higher shares of skilled labor. Strong correlations between within-industry skil1 upgrading and both increased investment in computers on the one hand and increased investment in R&D on the other provide further evidence for production labor saving technological change.

JEL-codes: J23 J24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1993-01
Note: LS PR
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (278) Track citations by RSS feed

Published as Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 1994, pp. 367-397.

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w4255.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4255

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w4255

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2017-12-18
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4255