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The Changing Labor Market Position of Canadian Immigrants

David Bloom, Gilles Grenier () and Morley Gunderson ()

No 4672, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper uses pooled 1971, 1981, and 1986 Canadian census data to evaluate the extent to which (1) the earnings of Canadian immigrants at the time of immigration fall short of the earnings of comparable Canadian-born individuals, and (2) immigrants' earnings grow more rapidly over time than those of the Canadian-born. Variations in the labor market assimilation of immigrants according to their gender and country of origin are also analyzed. The results suggest that recent immigrant cohorts have had more difficulty being assimilated into the Canadian labor market than earlier ones, an apparent consequence of recent changes in Canadian immigration policy, labor market discrimination against visible minorities, and the prolonged recession of the early 1980s.

JEL-codes: J15 J31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1994-03
Note: LS
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Published as David E. Bloom & Gilles Grenier & Morley Gunderson, 1995. "The Changing Labour Market Position of Canadian Immigrants," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 28(4b), pages 987-1005, November.

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Related works:
Journal Article: The Changing Labour Market Position of Canadian Immigrants (1995)
Working Paper: The Changing Labour Market Position of Canadian Immigrants (1993)
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