EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Long-Term Declines in Disability Among Older Men: Medical Care, Public Health, and Occupational Change

Dora Costa

No 7605, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Functional disability (difficulty in walking , difficulty in bending, paralysis, blindness in at least one eye, and deafness in at least one ear) in the United States has fallen at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent among men age 50 to 74 from the early twentieth century to the early 1990s. Twenty-four to 41 percent of this decline is attributable to innovations in medical care, 37 percent to reduced chronic disease rates, and the remainder is unexplained. The portion due to reduced chronic disease rates can be subdivided into the 9 percent accounted for by reduced infectious disease rates (particularly rheumatic fever, malaria, typhoid, and acute respiratory infections), the 7 percent accounted for by occupational shifts away from manual labor and to white collar jobs, and the 21 percent that is unexplained.

JEL-codes: I12 N31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2000-03
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-pub
Note: AG DAE HC
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (6) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w7605.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Long-Term declines in Disability Among Older Men: Medical Care, Public Health, and Occupational Change (2000)
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7605

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w7605

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2020-04-22
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7605