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International Price-Fixing Cartels and Developing Countries: A Discussion of Effects and Policy Remedies

Margaret Levenstein, Valerie Suslow and Lynda Oswald

No 9511, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: We examine the possible effects of private international cartels on developing countries by looking in detail at three recent cartel cases, as well as at a broader cross-section of 42 recently prosecuted international cartels. We discuss the indirect effects on developing country producers, either as competitors or co-conspirators, as well the direct effects of cartels on developing country consumers. By combining trade data with a sample of US and European prosecutions of international cartels in the 1990s, we are able to estimate the order of magnitude of the consequences of these cartels on developing countries as consumers. In 1997, the latest year for which we have trade data, developing countries imported $54.7 billion of goods from a sub-sample of 19 industries that contained a price-fixing conspiracy during the 1990s. These imports represented 5.2% of total imports and 1.2% of GDP in developing countries.

JEL-codes: L4 F1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dev
Date: 2003-02
Note: DAE
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Working Paper: International Price-Fixing Cartels and Developing Countries: A Discussion of Effects and Policy Remedies (2003) Downloads
Working Paper: International Price-Fixing Cartels and Developing Countries: A Discussion of Effects and Policy Remedies (2003) Downloads
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