EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Effect of Social Media on Elections: Evidence from the United States

Thomas Fujiwara, Karsten Müller and Carlo Schwarz
Additional contact information
Thomas Fujiwara: Princeton University and NBER
Karsten Müller: National University of Singapore

Working Papers from Princeton University. Economics Department.

Abstract: We study how social media affects election outcomes in the United States. We use variation in the number of Twitter users across counties induced by early adopters at the 2007 South by Southwest (SXSW) festival, a key event in Twitter’s rise to popularity. We show that this variation is unrelated to observable county characteristics and electoral outcomes before the launch of Twitter. Our results indicate that Twitter lowered the Republican vote share in the 2016 and 2020 presidential elections, but had limited effects on Congressional elections and previous presidential elections. Evidence from survey data, primary elections, and a text analysis of millions of tweets suggests that Twitter’s relatively liberal content may have persuaded voters with moderate views to vote against Donald Trump.

Keywords: voting behavior; elections (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D72 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2022-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cdm, nep-pay, nep-pol, nep-sea and nep-soc
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.princeton.edu/~fujiwara/papers/SocialMediaAndElections.pdf

Related works:
Working Paper: The Effect of Social Media on Elections: Evidence from the United States (2021) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:econom:2022-18

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from Princeton University. Economics Department.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Bobray Bordelon ().

 
Page updated 2023-01-22
Handle: RePEc:pri:econom:2022-18