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Prison-Based Education and Re-Entry into the Mainstream Labor Market

John Tyler and Jeffrey Kling
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John Tyler: Brown University and NBER

No 12, Working Papers from Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section.

Abstract: We estimate the post-release economic effects of participation in prison-based General Educational Development (GED) programs using a panel of earnings records and a rich set of individual information from administrative data in the state of Florida. Fixed effects estimates of the impact of participating in the GED education program show post-release quarterly earnings gains of about 15 percent for program participants relative to observationally similar nonparticipants. We also show, however, that these earnings gains accrue only to racial/ethnic minority offenders and any GED-related earnings gains for this group seem to fade in the third year after release from prison. Estimates comparing offenders who obtained a GED to those who participated in GED-related prison education programs but left prison without a GED show no systematic evidence of an independent impact of the credential itself on post-release quarterly earnings.

Keywords: Incarceration; GED; Earnings (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J31 J38 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2004-07
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Related works:
Working Paper: Prison-Based Education and Re-Entry into the Mainstream Labor Market (2006) Downloads
Working Paper: PRISON-BASED EDUCATION AND RE-ENTRY INTO THE MAINSTREAM LABOR MARKET (2004) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:indrel:489

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