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Understanding the Social and Cultural Bases of Brexit

Tak Wing Chan (), Morag Henderson, Maria Sironi and Juta Kawalerowicz
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Tak Wing Chan: Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education
Morag Henderson: Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education
Juta Kawalerowicz: Linkoping University

No 17-15, DoQSS Working Papers from Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London

Abstract: We use data from a large scale and nationally representative survey to explore the social and cultural bases of Brexit. There are strong age and educational gradients in Brexit support. Net of individual characteristics, regional differences within England become insignificant. In fact, once local level of immigration is taken into account, people living in the English regions are less pro-Leave than Londoners. It is social status, not social class, which predicts Brexit support. Economic deprivation does not predict Brexit attitude. Individuals living in areas with a higher concentration of migrants are actually less pro-Brexit. But recent increase in immigration level has the opposite association. Individuals for whom being British is important are more likely to support Leave. But those who choose national identity over sub-national identity and those reporting omnivorous cultural consumption are less supportive of Brexit. Those who live in the county in which they were born are more pro-Leave, but those who have stronger ties with their neighbours and neighbourhood, and those who are more involved in civic associations are pro-Remain. Overall, our results do not support the 'left-behind' narrative of Brexit. Instead, we show a strong cultural dimension in Brexit support.

Date: 2017-12-19
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int, nep-mig and nep-soc
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