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The long-term outcomes of refugees: tracking the progress of the East African Asians

Jake Anders (), Simon Burgess and Jonathan Portes ()
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Simon Burgess: University of Bristol

No 18-05, DoQSS Working Papers from Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London

Abstract: Refugees are often perceived as an economic "burden", as the current debate on the European refugee crisis illustrates. But there is little quantitative evidence on the medium-term outcomes of refugees in the UK. We fill this gap by looking at the case of "East African Asians" who arrived as refugees in the late 1960s and early 1970s. We use data from the UK Census to describe their economic outcomes forty years later. We show that their outcomes are at least as good as the population average, with the younger cohort performing better. Refugee status, as distinct from ethnicity or immigrant status, appears to have a positive impact.

Keywords: Migration; Refugees; East African Asians (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-06-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his, nep-lab and nep-mig
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Working Paper: The Long-Term Outcomes of Refugees: Tracking the Progress of the East African Asians (2018) Downloads
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