EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Monetary Policy, Endogenous Inattention, and the Output-Inflation Variance Tradeoff

Bruce McGough (), William Branch () and John Carlson ()

No 136, Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 from Society for Computational Economics

Abstract: Many models of monetary policy predict a trade-off between inflation and output variance despite compelling evidence that the Federal Reserve has become more aggressive in fighting inflation and there has been a resulting decline in both inflation and output variance. We address this apparent puzzle by studying the interaction of optimal monetary policy and agents' beliefs. Following (Ball, Mankiw, and Reis 2003) we depart from the Rational Expectations hypothesis and instead posit that there is costly information gathering. We assume that agents choose the rate at which they acquire new information by minimizing a quadratic loss subject to a linear cost function increasing in the rate of information accrual. We show that the solution to this minimization problem depends on the choices of other agents in the economy. Endogenous inattention is a Nash equilibrium in the rate of information processing. We show that multiple equilibria abound. Moreover, there is a non-monotonic trade-off between inflation and output variance, so that if policy is sufficiently `hawkish' against inflation, both inflation and output variance are positively related.

Keywords: Expectations; optimal monetary policy; bounded rationality; multiple equilibria (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E52 E31 D83 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2004-08-11
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

There are no downloads for this item, see the EconPapers FAQ for hints about obtaining it.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sce:scecf4:136

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 from Society for Computational Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Christopher F. Baum ().

 
Page updated 2020-03-29
Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf4:136