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Do Green Jobs Differ from Non-Green Jobs in Terms of Skills and Human Capital?

Davide Consoli (), Giovanni Marin (), Francesco Vona () and Alberto Marzucchi

SPRU Working Paper Series from SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School

Abstract: This paper elaborates an empirical analysis of labour force characteristics associated to environmental sustainability. Using data from the United States we compare green and non-green occupations to detect differences in terms of skill content and of human capital. The empirical profiling proposed here reveals that green jobs use non-routine (resp. routine) cognitive skills significantly more (resp. less) than non-green jobs. Green occupations also exhibit higher levels of formal education, work experience and on-the-job training. While preliminary, our exploratory exercise seeks to call attention to an underdeveloped theme, namely the labour market implications associated with the transition towards green growth.

Keywords: Skills; Green Jobs; Task Model; Human Capital (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J21 J24 O31 O33 Q20 Q40 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-env and nep-hrm
Date: 2015-05
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Related works:
Journal Article: Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital? (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital? (2015) Downloads
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