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Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital?

Davide Consoli (), Giovanni Marin (), Alberto Marzucchi and Francesco Vona ()

Research Policy, 2016, vol. 45, issue 5, 1046-1060

Abstract: This paper elaborates an empirical analysis of labour force characteristics that emerge as a response to the growing importance of environmental sustainability. Using data on the United States we compare green and non-green occupations to detect differences in terms of skill content and of human capital. Our empirical profiling reveals that green jobs use more intensively high-level cognitive and interpersonal skills compared to non-green jobs. Green occupations also exhibit higher levels of standard dimensions of human capital such as formal education, work experience and on-the-job training. While preliminary, our exploratory exercise seeks to call attention to an underdeveloped theme, namely the labour market implications associated with the transition towards green growth.

Keywords: Skills; Green jobs; Task model; Human capital (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O33 E24 Q55 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016
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Related works:
Working Paper: Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital? (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Do Green Jobs Differ from Non-Green Jobs in Terms of Skills and Human Capital? (2015) Downloads
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