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Marriage and the City

Pieter Gautier (), Michael Svarer () and Coen N. Teulings ()
Additional contact information
Coen N. Teulings: University of Amsterdam, SEO

No 05-015/3, Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers from Tinbergen Institute

Abstract: Do people move to cities because of marriage market considerations? In citiessingles can meet more potential partners than in rural areas. Singles are thereforeprepared to pay a premium in terms of higher housing prices. Once married, themarriage market benefits disappear while the housing premium remains. We extendthe model of Burdett and Coles (1997) with a distinction between efficient (cities)and less efficient (non-cities) search markets. One implication of the model is thatsingles are more likely to move from rural areas to cities while married couples aremore likely to make the reverse movement. A second prediction of the model is thatattractive singles benefit most from a dense market (i.e. from being choosy). Those predictions are tested with a unique Danish dataset. This discussion paper resulted in a publication in the 'Journal of Urban Economics' , 67(2), 206-18.

Keywords: Marriage; search; mobility; city (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J12 J64 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2005-02-03
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https://papers.tinbergen.nl/05015.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Marriage and the City (2005) Downloads
Working Paper: Marriage and the City (2005) Downloads
Working Paper: Marriage and the City (2005) Downloads
Working Paper: Marriage and the City (2005) Downloads
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