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Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training

Matteo Picchio () and Jan van Ours ()

No 2015-051, Discussion Paper from Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research

Abstract: Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, parttime working women are as likely to receive training as full-time working women. Although we cannot rule out gender-working time specific monopsony power, we speculate that the gender-specific effect of working hours on training has to do with gender-specific stereotyping. In the Netherlands, for women it is common to work part-time. More than half of the prime age female employees work part-time. Therefore, because of social norms, men working part-time could send a different signal to their employer than women working part-time. This might generate a different propensity of firms to sponsor training of male part-timers than female part-timers.

Keywords: part-time employment; working hours; firm-sponsored training; gender; human capital (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C33 C35 J24 M51 M53 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-hrm and nep-lma
Date: 2015
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Related works:
Journal Article: Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training (2015) Downloads
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