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Marriage, Work and Migration: The Role of Infrastructure Development and Gender Norms

Amrit Amirapu, M Asadullah () and Zaki Wahhaj

Studies in Economics from School of Economics, University of Kent

Abstract: Traditional gender norms can restrict independent migration by women, thus preventing them from taking advantage of economic opportunities in urban non-agricultural industries. However, women may be able to circumvent such restrictions by using marriage to engage in long-distance migration - if they are wealthy enough to match with the desirable migrating grooms. Guided by a model in which women make marriage and migration decisions jointly, we hypothesize that marriage and labour markets will be inextricably linked by the possibility of marital migration. To test our hypotheses, we use the event of the construction of a major bridge in Bangladesh - which dramatically reduced travel time between the economically deprived north-western region and the industrial belt located around the capital city Dhaka - as a source of plausibly exogenous variation in migration costs. In accordance with our model's predictions, we find that the bridge construction induced marriage-related migration (not economic migration) among rural women, but only for those women coming from families above a poverty threshold.

Keywords: migration; marriage markets; female labour force participation; gender norms (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J12 J16 J61 O18 R23 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab, nep-mig, nep-soc and nep-ure
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Working Paper: Marriage, work, and migration: The role of infrastructure development and gender norms (2019) Downloads
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