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Learning versus stealing: how Important are market-share -- reallocations to India's productivity growth?

Ann Harrison (), Leslie Martin () and Shanthi Nataraj

No 5761, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: Recent trade theory emphasizes the role of market-share reallocations across firms ("stealing") in driving productivity growth, while the older literature focused on average productivity improvements ("learning"). The authors use comprehensive, firm-level data from India's organized manufacturing sector to show that market-share reallocations did play an important role in aggregate productivity gains immediately following the start of India's trade reforms in 1991. However, aggregate productivity gains during the overall period from 1985 to 2004 were driven largely by improvements in average productivity, which can be attributed to India's trade liberalization and FDI reforms.

Keywords: Economic Theory&Research; Industrial Management; E-Business; Labor Policies; Debt Markets (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2011-08-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eff
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Related works:
Journal Article: Learning versus Stealing: How Important Are Market-Share Reallocations to India's Productivity Growth? (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Learning Versus Stealing: How Important are Market-Share Reallocations to India's Productivity Growth? (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: Learning versus Stealing How Important are Market-Share Reallocations to India's Productivity Growth (2011)
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