EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does more education always improve mental health? Evidence from a British compulsory schooling reform

Avendano, M.; de Coulon, A.; Nafilyan, V.;
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Augustin de Coulon and Vahé Nafilyan ()

Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers from HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York

Abstract: In this paper, we test whether education has a causal effect on mental health by exploiting a compulsory schooling reform in 1972, which raised the minimum school leaving age from 15 to 16 years old in Great Britain. Using a regression discontinuity design, we provide robust evidence that although the reform increased educational attainment, it also increased the prevalence of depression and other mental health conditions in adulthood. Our results do not imply that more schooling per se leads to poorer mental health, but rather suggest that forcing low achieving teenagers to remain in an academic environment may have long-term unintended consequences on their mental health.

Keywords: Mental health; education; compulsory schooling; UK (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I12 I21 I28 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-edu, nep-eur and nep-hea
Date: 2017-04
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/hedg/workingpapers/1710.pdf Main text (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:yor:hectdg:17/10

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers from HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Jane Rawlings ().

 
Page updated 2019-02-11
Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:17/10